2020 All Rights Reserved Hip4Kids Carmel, NY 10512 - 212-772- 6215
CURRICULUM

Overview

Students learn about the early years of the New Netherland colony and identify economic, political and social objectives of the Dutch West India Company, the settlers of the colony, and the native population.

Objectives

Students will: Identify economic, political and social objectives of Dutch exploration and settlement in New Netherland; Recognize the interconnected roles of the Dutch West India Company, settlers and indigenous people in the development of New Netherland; Dramatize the perspectives of multiple groups in a given scenario; Recognize the impact of Dutch exploration and settlement on the indigenous people of New York.

The Lesson

1. Check for prior knowledge by asking students what it means to be a colony. Take student responses. 2. Next ask students to read the following sentence and explain its meaning: The Netherlands, a small country in Europe, was the "mother country" to the New Netherland colony in America. 3. Continue by asking: What does the expression "mother country" mean? What was the relationship between the Netherlands and New Netherland? How do you think a country establishes a colony? What steps might be involved? What would be the reasons for a country to establish a colony? 4. Take student responses and discuss. Next, ask students what they know about the early colonies in what is now New York State. Ask students, "Who do you think arrived in New York first, the English or the Dutch?" Tally the answers on the board. 5. To introduce the topic of Dutch New York, explain that the Netherlands was one of the earliest European nations to successfully establish colonial settlements in the northeast area of what is now the United States. The Dutch settlements were in areas that are now parts of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Delaware. New York City, or Manhattan, was known as "New Amsterdam." They also had a settlement in what is now Albany, New York called "Fort Orange." The Dutch governed settlements in the New Netherland colony from 1624 until the English invaded in 1664 and claimed the Dutch territory for England. 6. Explain to students that most colonies are influenced by the country that established them so that their roots are connected to the values and customs of the "mother country." For example, ask students why English, and not French, Spanish or Dutch, is the main language spoken in the United States. The correct response, of course, is that the United States was once a colony of England so we speak the English language. Next, ask students if they can think of other ways the influence of the "mother country" can be seen in a colony. Encourage a variety of responses, making sure that economic, political and social influences are all addressed. Possible responses include: how goods are exchanged or traded, money, taxes, laws, government, rulers, occupations, schools/education, types of buildings, clothes people wear, what people eat, religion. Write the responses on the board. 7. Break students into groups and give each group a dictionary. Ask students to look up the words economic, political and social. 8. Complete the exercise by having a whole-class discussion to enhance the students’ general understanding of the topic and the definitions. 9. Return to the responses in step #6 and ask the students to work in groups to organize them into three separate columns, one for economic influences, one for political influences and one for social influences. Review student responses and discuss the reasons why each response was categorized as economic, political or social.

Objective: To understand the importance of breakfast on a daily basis in and out of school and how this reflects on

a student's ability to learn and study as well as eating the right amount of calories to balance the body's need for

the day.

Do Now: An old proverb suggests that an apple a day keeps the doctor away. Explain what you think that proverb means. The class will then share their responses. The students will then be given 5-7 minutes to work in groups to generate a list (on chart paper) of what they think the top ten health benefits of eating apples is. Each group will then share their responses. The students will then look for commonalities in their lists. The teacher will then share the following list of the top ten reasons for eating apples. Bone Protection French researchers found that a flavanoid called phloridzin that is found only in apples may protect post-menopausal women from osteoporosis and may also increase bone density. Boron, another ingredient in apples, also strengthens bones. Asthma Help One recent study shows that children with asthma who drank apple juice on a daily basis suffered from less wheezing than children who drank apple juice only once per month. Another study showed that children born to women who eat a lot of apples during pregnancy have lower rates of asthma than children whose mothers ate few apples. Alzheimer's Prevention A study on mice at Cornell University found that the quercetin in apples may protect brain cells from the kind of free radical damage that may lead to Alzheimer's disease. Lower Cholesterol The pectin in apples lowers LDL (bad) cholesterol. People who eat two apples per day may lower their cholesterol by as much as 16 percent. Lung Cancer Prevention According to a study of 10,000 people, those who ate the most apples had a 50 percent lower risk of developing lung cancer. Researchers believe this is due to the high levels of the flavonoids quercetin and naringin in apples. Breast Cancer Prevention A Cornell University study found that rats who ate one apple per day reduced their risk of breast cancer by 17 percent. Rats fed three apples per day reduced their risk by 39 percent and those fed six apples per day reduced their risk by 44 percent. Colon Cancer Prevention One study found that rats fed an extract from apple skins had a 43 percent lower risk of colon cancer. Other research shows that the pectin in apples reduces the risk of colon cancer and helps maintain a healthy digestive tract. Liver Cancer Prevention Research found that rats fed an extract from apple skins had a 57 percent lower risk of liver cancer. Diabetes Management The pectin in apples supplies galacturonic acid to the body which lowers the body’s need for insulin and may help in the management of diabetes. Weight Loss A Brazilian study found that women who ate three apples or pears per day lost more weight while dieting than women who did not eat fruit while dieting.

Whole class lesson wrap up and exit discussion will be followed by a 30 Minute Demo/Student Cooking Lesson -

Filmed for You Tube or www.hip4kids.org upload.

30 Minute overview and clean-up.

2020 All Rights Reserved Hip4Kids Carmel, NY 10512 - 212-772- 6215
CURRICULUM

Overview

Students learn about the early years of the New Netherland colony and identify economic, political and social objectives of the Dutch West India Company, the settlers of the colony, and the native population.

Objectives

Students will: Identify economic, political and social objectives of Dutch exploration and settlement in New Netherland; Recognize the interconnected roles of the Dutch West India Company, settlers and indigenous people in the development of New Netherland; Dramatize the perspectives of multiple groups in a given scenario; Recognize the impact of Dutch exploration and settlement on the indigenous people of New York.

The Lesson

1. Check for prior knowledge by asking students what it means to be a colony. Take student responses. 2. Next ask students to read the following sentence and explain its meaning: The Netherlands, a small country in Europe, was the "mother country" to the New Netherland colony in America. 3. Continue by asking: What does the expression "mother country" mean? What was the relationship between the Netherlands and New Netherland? How do you think a country establishes a colony? What steps might be involved? What would be the reasons for a country to establish a colony? 4. Take student responses and discuss. Next, ask students what they know about the early colonies in what is now New York State. Ask students, "Who do you think arrived in New York first, the English or the Dutch?" Tally the answers on the board. 5. To introduce the topic of Dutch New York, explain that the Netherlands was one of the earliest European nations to successfully establish colonial settlements in the northeast area of what is now the United States. The Dutch settlements were in areas that are now parts of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Delaware. New York City, or Manhattan, was known as "New Amsterdam." They also had a settlement in what is now Albany, New York called "Fort Orange." The Dutch governed settlements in the New Netherland colony from 1624 until the English invaded in 1664 and claimed the Dutch territory for England. 6. Explain to students that most colonies are influenced by the country that established them so that their roots are connected to the values and customs of the "mother country." For example, ask students why English, and not French, Spanish or Dutch, is the main language spoken in the United States. The correct response, of course, is that the United States was once a colony of England so we speak the English language. Next, ask students if they can think of other ways the influence of the "mother country" can be seen in a colony. Encourage a variety of responses, making sure that economic, political and social influences are all addressed. Possible responses include: how goods are exchanged or traded, money, taxes, laws, government, rulers, occupations, schools/education, types of buildings, clothes people wear, what people eat, religion. Write the responses on the board. 7. Break students into groups and give each group a dictionary. Ask students to look up the words economic, political and social. 8. Complete the exercise by having a whole-class discussion to enhance the students’ general understanding of the topic and the definitions. 9. Return to the responses in step #6 and ask the students to work in groups to organize them into three separate columns, one for economic influences, one for political influences and one for social influences. Review student responses and discuss the reasons why each response was categorized as economic, political or social.

Objective: To understand the importance of breakfast

on a daily basis in and out of school and how this re-

flects on a student's ability to learn and study as well as

eating the right amount of calories to balance the

body's need for the day.

Do Now: An old proverb suggests that an apple a day keeps the doctor away. Explain what you think that proverb means. The class will then share their responses. The students will then be given 5-7 minutes to work in groups to generate a list (on chart paper) of what they think the top ten health benefits of eating apples is. Each group will then share their responses. The students will then look for commonalities in their lists. The teacher will then share the following list of the top ten reasons for eating apples. Bone Protection French researchers found that a flavanoid called phloridzin that is found only in apples may protect post-menopausal women from osteoporosis and may also increase bone density. Boron, another ingredient in apples, also strengthens bones. Asthma Help One recent study shows that children with asthma who drank apple juice on a daily basis suffered from less wheezing than children who drank apple juice only once per month. Another study showed that children born to women who eat a lot of apples during pregnancy have lower rates of asthma than children whose mothers ate few apples. Alzheimer's Prevention A study on mice at Cornell University found that the quercetin in apples may protect brain cells from the kind of free radical damage that may lead to Alzheimer's disease. Lower Cholesterol The pectin in apples lowers LDL (bad) cholesterol. People who eat two apples per day may lower their cholesterol by as much as 16 percent. Lung Cancer Prevention According to a study of 10,000 people, those who ate the most apples had a 50 percent lower risk of developing lung cancer. Researchers believe this is due to the high levels of the flavonoids quercetin and naringin in apples. Breast Cancer Prevention A Cornell University study found that rats who ate one apple per day reduced their risk of breast cancer by 17 percent. Rats fed three apples per day reduced their risk by 39 percent and those fed six apples per day reduced their risk by 44 percent. Colon Cancer Prevention One study found that rats fed an extract from apple skins had a 43 percent lower risk of colon cancer. Other research shows that the pectin in apples reduces the risk of colon cancer and helps maintain a healthy digestive tract. Liver Cancer Prevention Research found that rats fed an extract from apple skins had a 57 percent lower risk of liver cancer. Diabetes Management The pectin in apples supplies galacturonic acid to the body which lowers the body’s need for insulin and may help in the management of diabetes. Weight Loss A Brazilian study found that women who ate three apples or pears per day lost more weight while dieting than women who did not eat fruit while dieting.

Whole class lesson wrap up and exit discussion will be

followed by a 30 Minute Demo/Student Cooking Lesson -

Filmed for You Tube or www.hip4kids.org upload.

30 Minute overview and clean-up.